April Meeting Announcement

DATE:    Wednesday, April 27th, 2016
PLACE:  Hawthorne Lucky Lab Brew Pub, 915 SE Hawthorne Blvd
TIME:     11:30 a.m. Networking, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Presentation
SPEAKER:  Scott Wells, PSU
TOPIC: Is the Dead Sea Dead?


scott wells 2

The Dead Sea is a terminal lake and is the lowest water body on the earth’s surface. As a result of historic changes in inflows to the Dead Sea, water levels are now receding at more than 1 m per year. There have been many proposed solutions to the ‘dying’ Dead Sea such as reinvigorating the Jordan River by bringing in desalinated water from the Mediterranean Sea and pumping sea water from the Gulf of Aquaba. Water quality impacts on the Dead Sea were evaluated for the latter solution by constructing a suite of mathematical models of the circulation and chemistry in the Dead Sea. Will these proposed ‘solutions’ save the Dead Sea?


Bio: Scott Wells, Professor Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Portland State University

He has a Ph.D. from Cornell University in Civil and Environmental Engineering, and graduate and undergraduate degrees from MIT and Tennessee Technological University. His current research focus is environmental fluid mechanics: modeling of surface water quality and hydrodynamics and solid-liquid separation processes. He has written over 100 technical publications.

He has been involved in well-over 100 water body studies throughout the United States in Oregon, Hawaii, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Idaho, California, Oklahoma, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Montana, New York, Colorado, and Florida. He has also been involved in projects in Canada, Guyana, Peru, Brazil, China, Ukraine and Israel/Jordan. He has received 2 Fulbright scholar awards, one to the Ukraine working on the Dnieper River and the other to Israel where he is continuing to work on a computer simulation model of the Dead Sea.

He is a co-author of the water quality and hydrodynamic model, CE-QUAL-W2, used throughout the world for hydrodynamic and water quality modeling studies. He has been actively involved in studies for local, state and federal government as they work on improving water quality in surface water systems and in understanding the environmental impacts of reservoirs and how to manage water quality in surface water systems.

Amber Clayton on the Portland 2016 SWMM

Amber packed the place out: standing room only! She discussed the upcoming changes to the Portland 2016 Stormwater design manual.

Public Comment Period April 4 – May 6portland map

Adoption: July 1st 2016

  • – Three month phase-in (use 2014 SWMM or 2016 SWMM/SCM)
  • – 2016 SWMM and 2016 SCM required starting October 1st 2016

Attachments

EWRG March Meeting Announcement

DATE:    Wednesday, March 30th, 2016
PLACE:  Hawthorne Lucky Lab Brew Pub, 915 SE Hawthorne Blvd
TIME:     11:30 a.m. Networking, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Presentation
SPEAKER:  Amber Clayton
TOPIC: Portland’s 2016 Stormwater Management Manual


smmm pdx 2016This presentation will discuss the goals of the proposed 2016 revisions to the City’s SWMM, key highlights to look forward to, and a summary of the public comment and adoption process. A draft proposed SWMM will be released for public comment in April. The public comment period for proposed changes will be April 4th through May 2nd. Highlights of the 2016 SWMM revisions include:

  • – System-specific stormwater requirements that reinforce the existing stormwater infiltration and discharge hierarchy
  • – A new Presumptive Approach Calculator interface
  • – Updated stormwater facility design criteria and typical details
  • – Separate Source Controls (previously Chapter 4) into its own administrative rule

Amber Clayton is the City of Portland Environmental Services Stormwater Management Manual Program Manager.  She has 15 years’ experience in stormwater and watershed management, including public-private partnerships, stormwater facility design and construction, and stormwater-related regulatory policy.  She is currently leading the Bureau’s effort to update the Stormwater Management Manual.